Johansson’s voice charms audiences in technological romance film

Jimmy Graner, Rocket Contributor
January 30, 2014
Filed under Campus Life

4.5/5 stars

Love is complex when it comes to defining the right person. Some of us move from relationship to relationship, some of us find love the very first time around, and for others, love seems impossible. With today’s judgment, it can be hard for a person to express their true feelings for someone else. But when that special someone does come into your life, no matter what the circumstances are, will you show and embrace that love, or let others deprive you of it?

Her, a film written and directed by Spike Jonze, follows a man by the name of Theodore Twombly (Joaquin Phoenix), a wistful writer who composes love letters for people who cannot express feelings on their own. After going through the process of a harsh divorce with his longtime love, Catherine (Rooney Mara), Theodore purchases an operating system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson) that’s designed to make him happy in every way. After a few short weeks, the operating system, now known as Samantha, becomes more than just a talking device.

In a way, this movie is more than just entertainment; it’s more of a wake up call for the people watching it. It takes place in a near future where technology has seemingly taken over. People are more active with the online realm, whether it is for their job or enjoying a video game. It leaves the message that we as people are relying too much on technology to make our lives better when it’s other people and our surroundings that can do it. Although, the bond the two share is like something I’ve never seen before. To have a device that is capable of having a conversation and learning from you is simply remarkable. Because technology keeps evolving, it can be hard for us to drop everything we’re doing and resort back to the Stone Age like nothing’s ever evolved. In the end though, all good things must have some sort of declining end, and that’s when the truth about love and technology finally comes to a halt.

Phoenix, who usually plays a more serious role, brings more to the table as a troubled romantic than the usual protagonist. Johansson, whom many have come to know and love in countless movies, is simply astounding as a female voice who can merely please any man with a tearful laugh or remark. The supporting roles of Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, Chris Pratt and even the voice of Jonze himself adds to the spark of interest in the storyline.

As this movie teaches, as crazy as it seems, we all have some type of relationship with our own operating devices. While our devices may not have brains, the treatment we give them is almost as if they do.  Either way, we’re all looking for some sort of acceptance and intimacy when it comes to feeling loved.

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